SND36 Silvers

Judges awarded 56 Silver Medals in the 36th edition, covering 2014.
Awards are listed here by category:

News Design [Pages]
Breaking News Topics
Features Design [Pages]
Page Design [Portfolios]
Special Sections
Magazine Design
Illustration
Photography
Information Graphics
Redesign
Miscellaneous
Combination print/digital

News Design [Pages]

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1. The Plain Dealer

‘I can’t breathe.’
Judges’ comments: “This is a topic of national importance that the paper tackled through a local story. The design confronts readers with an issue they can’t ignore and asks if this behavior should be tolerated. This is the kind of presentation where newspapers excel. We’ve seen this typographical device used before, but the declaration and repetition strongly achieves the desired effect.”

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2. The Washington Post

Baboozled-Panda
Judges’ comments: “The adorable panda illustrations distract readers from the story about the amount of money spent on renting pandas from China, which is the point of the presentation. This whimsical package smartly parallels the story’s message with a voice that is often lacking on other pages. It’s the definition of original.”

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Breaking News Topics

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3. The Plain Dealer

Sochi: Day 1
Judges’ comments: “This extremely approachable and usable presentation invites readers to dig into the coverage of this world event. The pacing is so good, readers are never overwhelmed but can digest this high volume of information at their leisure. In an era when some people are questioning the value of a printed product, this coverage proves it’s worth it.”

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Special News Topics

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4. Omaha World-Herald

Rembrandt Reborn
Judges’ comments: “This presentation was designed to allow a process of discovery for readers. The repeated use of the painting in slightly different contexts sets up a mystery that isn’t revealed until the inside pages. Before and after photos of the painting’s restoration provide easy comparison. A high level of planning, teamwork and collaboration is evident in the composition of every photo and details in the elegant typography.”

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5. The Buffalo News

Fracking’s boom and bust
Judges’ comments: “This is information organized beautifully. Every page is tightly edited, creating compelling pacing of photography, typography, graphics and text for a highly accessible package that helps readers digest all of it. The photo editing focuses on the human element of the story and introduces readers to people that feel familiar.”

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6. Los Angeles Times

The Oscars: A New Guard
Judges’ comments: “For readers who love to devour the details, this coverage provides layers of information, playful illustrations, beautiful portraiture presented with a clear and clever voice. This showcases what print journalism can do best in a time when we’re constantly reminded how digital is better. Even if you’ve watched the show and seen other coverage, you won’t want to miss this.”

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7. Los Angeles Times

Central Africa Republic
Judges’ comments: “It’s easy to imagine a story of this length that people wouldn’t read, but this presentation draws you through all of it, making you want to spend time with it. The dedication to photojournalism is apparent, but when these images are played at eight to 12 columns, it’s because they must be run at that size to see the impact of their details.”

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8. The Plain Dealer

Cleveland Browns Football
Judges’ comments: “Sports is about the spectacle and the crowds, and this sections reflects that fun attitude. The photos receive impressive play but are bursting with clutch moments cropped expertly. The innovative BrownsTown feature turns what could be boring boilerplate material into a must-see weekly feature by adding ingenious visual reportage. If aliens came to Earth, this section could help explain sports to them.”

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9. Minneapolis Star Tribune

State of Wonders
Judges’ comments: “These pages depict different regions of the state of Minnesota documented by one photographer over four seasons. Phenomenal photojournalism is matched by elegant typography and restrained design. All the details form a well-orchestrated whole.”

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10. Dagens Nyheter

Where you live governs your cultural consumption
Judges’ comments: “These pages highlight the culture gap between metropolitan and rural populations using a strong color-coded structure. All of the details from the covers to inside pages reinforce the overall story. Each of the illustrations evoke deep meanings that help you understand the subject before reading the translation.”

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Features Design [Pages]

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11. Compendium on Race

Racism is predictable
Judges’ comments: “It feels like a series of posters, integrated into a single publication. Urban environments, planning, how that integrates with the sociology: they’re complex topics done in an elegant way. You recognize the type as forms before you recognize them as letters, it draws you into the content. The style follows throughout. It’s an example of design that starts a conversation and challenges people.”

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12. The Washington Post

Summer TV
Judges’ comments: “It says American Summer in a creative way. It’s almost like she’s disappearing into the sand. It’s iconic and innovative. It works great as a cover because it brings you into the content that’s inside and it’s emblematic of the rest of the section. I want to jump into this. People will look at this and think “I never would have thought about this approach in a million years.”

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13. The Washington Post

James Earl Jones
Judges’ comments: “I love the way it mirrors his movements. It reflects with a parallel design. Normally, a crop like this would be unusual, but it works here. It makes him seem more vulnerable. The layers of the typography make sense, everything contrasts. The alignment is strong, there’s a balance to the page. Instead of being awkward, it has a tension.”

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Page Design [Portfolios]

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14. South China Morning Post

Alberto Lucas Lopez individual portfolio
Judges’ comments: “The density of information here is exceptionally well-designed. There are a lot of nice, balanced entry points in every page. The satellite network page is very stark, it’s a simple way to tackle a difficult subject to explain. The skyscraper page is outstanding. It’s a profound way to handle very complex subjects.”

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15. The Washington Post

Staff features portfolio
Judges’ comments: “The variety of different approaches and the fact that they were able to pull these off very well and at an extremely high level impressed me. They’re taking chances and succeeding at it. The chicken and painted smoke is an interesting combination of real life and abstract art.”

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16. The Washington Post

Staff combination portfolio
Judges’ comments: “I love the breaking news page, the softer news presentation, the NFL preview, there are some styles here I’ve never seen. It shows a dedication to visual range. The N-word page works on so many levels. The photography is strong in the spread. There’s an incredible range here.”

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17. The Plain Dealer

Staff combination portfolio
Judges’ comments: “This is a really nice combination of type treatment, big photo plays, different uses and really nice art direction. It shows an incredible range of skills, more so than any other portfolio, it rises above the others. There are so many styles represented, yet the typography and foundation unifies it.”

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Special Sections

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18. El Mundo

Cronica (10 years of Terrorist attacks in Madrid)
Judges’ comments: “This section has great illustrations and documentary elements. There is a great range of storytelling techniques and devices used throughout to engage a reader. It displays an exceptional degree of difficulty, and never once feels jarring.”

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19. Politiken

Foto / Photo section
Judges’ comments: “The photo selection is impressive. You immediately see the photos of the family from the fire … it’s stunning photography, dramatic photography; but it’s also photography with humor. You have such a range from grim to emotional to whimsy.”

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20. The Plain Dealer

Sochi Olympics
Judges’ comments: “The best Olympic coverage is seen throughout: it surprises, and there is variation between each. In a video and digital age, it’s surprising that a print product can surprise you with its Olympics coverage. They stayed committed to the coverage — it never felt roped or forced.”

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21. Die Welt

2014: Ein Vorschau von A-Z
Judges’ comments: “This coverage works consistently. Every page had special typography that was played throughout so nicely. Many times, you see an idea that is clever — they made a clever idea work from A to Z from the very first letter. They elevated it beyond anything we’ve seen before.”

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22. The Plain Dealer

Home (LeBron returns cover)
Judges’ comments: “They had to commit to this illustration before LeBron even made his decision to come home. He was waffling and they had to plan ahead. There’s a simplicity in this design with a little touch of yellow and the beautiful dust at the top. There’s strength in his posture and in the humble quote.”

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23. Omaha World-Herald

McDermott inside page
Judges’ comments: “This is about a star player who has been in the area forever and it’s information you can’t get anywhere else. It’s a strong effort for something their readers care a lot about. It’s easy to look at it as an array of shapes that bounce around, but the information is presented well. It’s so smart and thoughtful.”

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24. Los Angeles Times

Calendar cover (The Oscars)
Judges’ comments: “With most of the spadeas you see, it’s a nuisance. But in this case, it actually enhances the illustration. It’s really well done. It’s also a tactile thing where you are pulling the curtain back as you open it. This reminds people there are human beings that work at the paper, it has a human touch.”

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Magazine Design

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25. Variety

New Dimensions
Judges’ comments: “These covers stop you in your tracks and force you to pay attention. You get lost in the shapes and overlaying images. The exact layering of images shows that these covers were carefully planned and executed. Each set of photos reveals contrasting personalities of the actors with a transparency and motion reminiscent of film. The more you look, the more you see.”

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26. Metropoli

15 amusement parks
Judges’ comments: “The design and illustration are expertly intertwined. The strong use of space, the playfulness of the line, and the integration of the type create a striking and innovative approach to a cover. The page invites readers to take a ride. It says fun in the most sophisticated way possible.”

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Illustration

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27. The Plain Dealer

A face in the crowd
Judges’ comments: “This is more art more than illustration—it makes you feel. The piece is pushes the boundaries of abstract representation but conveys something so realistic and gives readers insight into the subject. It shows the power of a brushstroke to imply form and content. The opinion page is right place for art that elicits strong reactions. We wish more opinion sections would do this.”

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28. The New York Times Magazine

What Should Children Eat?
Judges’ comments: “This illustration achieves a level of interactivity and animation through the powerful juxtaposition of size and color. The repetition of circles implies movement. Its simplicity and playfulness make a powerful connection with readers.”

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29. The Boston Globe

Books: Falling under his spell
Judges’ comments: “Book illustrations can tend to be one note, but this one captures a storybook quality that sucks you in the more you study it—much like what a good book can do. The gravitational pull of this piece seems to be so strong that it’s draining the color from the surrounding objects as well. This piece is a tutorial on what illustration should aim for—to deeply connect with the content and makes readers think.”

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30. The New York Times Magazine

Hybrid Animals: Lions and tigers and bears oh, my!
Judges’ comments: “The odd juxtaposition of overlapping different species creates a striking and absurdist effect. The choice of colors symbolizes polar opposite animals and evokes 3-D imagery—your brain attempts to combine the images. The illustrations challenge our notions of what it means to be a species through the animals they chose to combine.”

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31. Metropoli

Illustration portfolio
Judges’ comments: “We often see this technically difficult pen and ink style applied to historical content, but its use on entertainment is fun and unexpected. The playful treatment creates arresting pages. Readers must be excited to see what this magazine will do next. What better way to create reader loyalty?”

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Photography

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32. The Washington Post

Conflict in Congo
Judges’ comments: “There is this color inside versus the monochromatic surroundings. At first glance, it’s gorgeous. A deeper look reveals so many more details. It’s an amazing moment. The boy’s eye contact in the middle of the photo works perfectly, it’s haunting. It’s almost like a Last Supper image.”

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33. The Buffalo News

Here We Go Again
Judges’ comments: “The absurdity of the amount of snow was shocking. The depth of the snow is reaching to the roofs, and the aerial view gives you a perspective you wouldn’t see. It’s poetic. Almost an illustration of futility. It’s perfect in its simplicity.”

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34. The New York Times

Blasts Kill 16 Seeking Haven at U.N. School
Judges’ comments: “It appears like he’s almost reaching out for whoever was on that bed before. The absence of a body emphasizes the loss. It’s almost a double-take, you start to notice the details and see who’s looking in through the window. It means the photographer is watching the action, but watching the fringes.”

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35. The New York Times

Kiev, Ukraine
Judges’ comments: “You get so much out of the face, out of the eyes. You see the busy-ness in the background, but it has focus and loads of emotion. You couldn’t commission an illustration that would capture the moment as great as this. It almost looks too perfect, the lines and the contrast. There’s just enough light capturing his eyes … any more or less, it wouldn’t work.”

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36. The New York Times

Home Deaths Spread Circle of Contagion
Judges’ comments: “Wow, the look on that kid’s face. You see cause and effect, a lot of emotion. The tension of the boy leaning away from the action of the people coming up with the body, it all adds to the emotion. To be a photographer in that, surrounded by that, but still be able to create a piece of art is remarkable. All of the lines compositionally lead you right to his face.”

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37. Ottawa Citizen

Content, Jonathon gets bandaged
Judges’ comments: “The uncomfortable moment is all seen in his face. His pale skin contrasts with the red, he’s vulnerable in so many ways. The way it’s lit is smart, the spill is all where it’s supposed to be, your eyes and focus are immediately drawn to him. The image is haunting, it will stick with you.”

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38. Los Angeles Times

Product of Mexico
Judges’ comments: “This set of photos has range, emotion, dynamics. Every photo feels like a surprise. The subject could be predictable, but I could spend time with each photo. There are 12 photos, and I want to study every one. The photo edit is superb, range of understanding of tight, loose, different perspectives in photography. The fact that there’s such a variety of shots, showing the people and their conditions — you see their whole world, not just a glimpse.”

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39. Helsingin Sanomat

Sunnuntai
Judges’ comments: “Cohesive. So many things had to go right for this to have the impact it does. Technically, framing things with silhouettes in live action is difficult to capture. These are outstanding. The images are incredibly emotional, I could see myself in all of these photos. There’s nothing to dilute the emotion. You get the feelings of the sparse physical landscape, but it makes you feel that their lives are sparse too. These photos work in the abstract, they could work as a painting.”

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40. Sunday Denver Post

CBD in Denver
Judges’ comments: “From a technical aspect, you have to remember that this story is not easy to show. It’s not the background or setting that’s telling the story, it’s the detail and successful execution and access that’s capturing the details. The moments here: When they hit, they really hit you. I can’t imagine the number of photos that were left on the cutting room floor just to get these moments.”

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41. Minneapolis Star Tribune

State of Wonders (Grace Amid a Snowy World)
Judges’ comments: “The edit brings so many individual pieces to life. The photos are beautiful. The use of color tells a story, you can immediately see the seasons: from the blue winter to the green spring. You’re seeing the state from all different angles: tight macro shots, wide expansive shots. These photos show something so unusual, so abstract. It has a wide and amazing array of different techniques.”

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42. The New York Times

Ebola’s Deadly Escape (individual portfolio)
Judges’ comments: “This collection shows an incredible range of work: Portraiture and scenes, color and black & white. Especially under the most difficult of photo situations, these images are impressive. Photos appear stripped down, nothing superfluous. The photographer is a true storyteller and understands the range needed in execution but also content.”

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43. Los Angeles Times

Staff portfolio
Judges’ comments: “The depth of skills and storytelling ability is truly remarkable. This is another example of the incredible photo editing happening at this newspaper. Separately, the photos are strong. Together, they’re even stronger. It’s remarkable to find a spread and range this wide and still find that every individual piece is strong.”

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Information Graphics

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44. Los Angeles Times

The evolution of California’s drought
Judges’ comments: “The gradual increase in the severity of California’s drought is depicted dramatically through the use of weekly increments. The graphic’s simplicity allows the alarming change that occurs in 2014 to jump out and almost creates the feel of animation. The color palate is naturally associated with the topic.”

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45. The New York Times

The fate of 23 hostages in Syria
Judges’ comments: “This brilliantly simple graphic handles complex material with great sensitivity. It seamlessly integrates the period of time, number of hostages, when and where they were taken, what happened to them while in captivity, and the final result. Delicate details tell the story without sensationalizing it.”

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46. The New York Times

Passing’s Arc of History
Judges’ comments: “This sports graphic stood out for its unusual form that metaphorically hints at the trajectory of a football pass. The background contextual information is dense but not overwhelming; the important pieces clearly push to the front. The more you study it, the more you can appreciate it.”

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47. The New York Times

Is that a luge in Times Square?
Judges’ comments: “These graphics make the scale of Winter Olympics events more tangible by placing them in the context of New York City landmarks. These graphics give a sense of scale that mere diagrams cannot provide. It’s a highbrow idea executed with finesse that changes the pace of the newspaper with a dash of humor. The more you study it, the deeper you go.”

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48. The New York Times

Changes to Ebola Protection
Judges’ comments: “To say you have a graphic that will take up that much space, plus be so simple and straightforward, it’s very smart. It feels like everything has the appropriate amount of space. They get it right every time. The content shines: these graphics are answering big questions. The content comes forward because there’s no visual noise. The restraint actually makes the graphics more bold.”

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49. Welt am Sonntag

Wissen, Death in Season
Judges’ comments: “Straight away, you see that time is a circle and you can see what the trends are. The intention has to be clear from the onset, and there’s no misunderstanding what the purpose is here. There are no extra tricks or shadows or unnecessary lines, you stay focused on the data and the story it’s telling. It’s bold, aggressive and interesting.”

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Redesign

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50. San Francisco Chronicle

Food + Home
Judges’ comments: “This encompasses what a successful redesign means. It uses improved storytelling in different forms. Combined two sections into one very visually strong section. There are nice details, too: they went up in space and consolidated ads. It feels very elegant and smart, looks more like a magazine now with a more inviting environment for the content.”

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51. Dagens Nyeter

Kultur
Judges’ comments: “The “After” has simple, bold photography and typography, there is a real commitment to a new vision for this publication. From front to back, the pages have a cleaner and more unified approach. They’re using high-key photography style that could be easy to butcher, but they are consistent and restrained. It’s bold, impactful and dramatic. The art direction is all-in, it appears like everything has a more refined approach.”

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Miscellaneous

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52. Times of Oman

World Cup coverage
Judges’ comments: “They let the design team drive this coverage for over a month, with discoveries and surprise. There’s humor and technical expertise. I love the yellow card page and how they carried that through and used it as a grid throughout that section. They engaged with fans in a visual way every day. I don’t know how they had the stamina to execute this.”

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53. A Compendium on Race

Racism
Judges’ comments: “This is a conversation about race, done in a variety of forms. It’s just stunning. There are so many snapshots and pieces of cool design but it moved me in an interesting way. I was blown away by this. They talk about racism and make it a delight to read. There’s something in the simplicity of each page and it carries a singular theme throughout the entire issue that is told in a different way on each page.”

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Combination print/digital

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54. The Washington Post

The N Word
Judges’ comments: “The print presentation is well done and quite interesting, but the digital version allows the emotion behind this divisive, racially charged word to come to life. The video reveals the tentative hesitation of the subjects talking about this uncomfortable subject. The ability to customize the videos puts this ahead of other video projects.”

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55. Folha de S. Paulo

Liquid uncertain: The future of Brazilian water resources
Judges’ comments: “This package quickly provides context in print and expands that exponentially online. It helps people make sense of data in terms that they can easily understand—and in immersive ways that aren’t available in print form. You don’t need to speak Portuguese in order to understand the impact of the scarcity of consumable water in the world.”

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56. National Geographic

China’s Supercaves
Judges’ comments: “An exquisite print package provides extraordinary investigative data storytelling, then the web experience takes you on a 3-D flythrough using a laser scanner to reconstruct caves in amazing detail. This reveals something that’s invisible and not accessible to 99 percent of the population and inspires a sense of wonder.”

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