Society of News Design

Posts tagged ‘Year-Long Conversation’

In 2012 SND will host a Year-Long Conversation about all things news design. The conversation will take place on the site and at various events around the world.

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Designing Election 2012: Share your pages, graphics and interactives here

After years of campaigning, gazillions of negative ads, thousands upon thousands of debates, oodles upon oodles of facts checked, gaffs that made their own gaffs, mailers, robocalls, stumping, swinging, polling, real-clear-politicking, all endlessly, breathlessly analyzed, re-analyzed and re-re-analyzed. And now we are here. Election Day 2012.

A day like no other.

Let’s see what you’ve done. Show your work here at SND | Show Your Work on tumblr. Click on the submit button and you can post a text or image file. Ask a question and then we’ll discuss, breakdown and breathlessly move on to the next big thing.

This week we’ll focus on the election, but think of this as our digital gathering spot where you can start to come to check out each others work.

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Election 2012: Storytelling + Humor = A microsite with attitude

The team at Cultivated Wit has a message for the American people: If you’re not voting in this election, your excuse sucks. Larry Buchanan talks about his involvement with the project he hopes will shame people into voting.

This is sixth in a week-long series of election coverage on SND.org.

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The view from London: Election 2012, roast beef and Romney

Michael Agar, region director for western Europe, reflects on British news coverage of the upcoming U.S. presidential election from a London pub.

This is part five in a week-long series of SND’s election coverage.

Election 2012: A look at pages from Mexico City

Coverage of the U.S. election in Mexico City was significant the major dailies El Universal, La Razón, Reporte Indigo, Reforma and Excélsior. Here is a sample of some of the work. A link to El Universal’s interactive analysis is here. Here is Excelsior’s special web site. And here is Reporto’s Indigo’s election site.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, right, and running mate Paul Ryan wave at the conclusion of a campaign rally at the Henderson Pavilion Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2012.

Election 2012: How Las Vegas Sun photographer Steve Marcus makes images of Governor Mitt Romney

Nevada — with its six electoral votes — is one of a handful of states President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney consider a toss up this election cycle. As both candidates make myriad stops in the area surrounding Sin City, Las Vegas Sun photographer Steve Marcus explains how he approaches making thoughtful and unique images of sometimes redundant campaign events.

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Election 2012: Inside the Washington Post’s digital efforts

How do you build successful digital products to cover a news event as large as a presidential election?

Sarah Sampsel, Director of Digital, Mobile and New Product Design at The Washington Post, offers her advice based on work her team has built in D.C.

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Election 2012: Pages from the Cincinnati Enquirer

SND continues its election coverage with pages from the Cincinnati Enquirer. Ohio is another battleground state this presidential election cycle; it has 18 electoral votes up for grabs.

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Meet SND’s Lifetime Achievement Award winners for 2012: Deb Withey and Roger Black

At the awards gathering at SND’s workshop in Cleveland this fall SND presented its Lifetime Achievement Award to Roger Black and Deb Withey. The Lifetime Achievement Award is the highest individual honor the Society can bestow and only 19 have received the it.

Roger’s vision and leadership has set the standard for newspaper and magazine design. His work with type and digital platforms has lead the way far out ahead of the rest of the industry. See the slideshow and read the script from the ceremony here.

Deb’s sense of community and gift for teaching transformed newsrooms of all sizes and her ability to use the tools of design to capture a place transformed communities. See the slideshow and read the script from the ceremony here.

Photo: Tamara Wade

Lauren Leto — co-founder of Texts From Last Night — on what media can learn from the social web

Lauren Leto is an author, co-founder, manager and self-described, “bookworm party girl.” Here, she shares insights on why anonymous comments are worth noticing and lessons journalists can take from the startup world.

Leto spoke with us as part of our year-long conversation about design.

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Bethany Heck on baseball, letterpress and the next stage of web storytelling

Bethany Heck is the designer behind Eephus League and end-grain. Her work on Eephus league magazine does some incredible storytelling. “I wanted the magazine to be immersive and experiential without being overwrought. Printed pieces have a pacing and rhythm to them that it usually lost on the web, and I feel like that missing element makes longer form reading difficult on the web. I also spent a lot of time on nitty gritty type details, like hanging punctuation and watching for rivers and widows. I know that most of that work is wasted time because of browser preferences, but it was important to me,” she said.

Heck spoke with us as part of our Year-Long Conversation about design.

Looking for more inspiration? Sign up for SND’s annual workshop in Cleveland here.

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Doug Wilson on the linotype machine, storytelling, and 1886

Doug Wilson is a designer. He’s also a filmmaker. And a letterpress lover.

Wilson is the producer/director of a documentary “Linotype: The Film,” that explores the “eighth wonder of the world” and how it revolutionized the printing industry. Wilson says the linotype was like the “Twitter of 1886” — understanding its impact crucial to our understanding today’s news cycle.

Wilson spoke with us as part of our Year-Long Conversation about design.

Looking for more inspiration? Sign up for SND’s annual workshop in Cleveland here.

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One theme per week. One story per day. All about New York.

One theme per week. One story per day, told in the medium best-suited for that story. Oh, and only about New York City.

No breaking news. No big headlines. No jam-packed news website front pages.

Sound like a dream job?

That’s the basic vision of Narratively, a new digital platform led by Noah Rosenberg, a 29 year-old journalist from Brooklyn. As a mix of text, images, graphics and interactives, the site is slated to launch later this month. Rosenberg and others on the team launched a Kickstarter campaign near the beginning of August to raise some startup cash and they’re about 80 percent of the way to the $50,000 funding goal with less than a week to go.

Rosenberg spoke with us as part of our Year-Long Conversation about design.

Looking for more inspiration? Sign up for SND’s annual workshop in Cleveland here.

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Erin Polgreen on Symbolia, a tablet magazine of illustrated journalism

Erin Polgreen wants to make the news, “more beautiful,” and she hopes her new project will do just that. Symbolia, which is set to release later this fall, is a tablet magazine of illustrated journalism.

Recently, she spoke with SND about the magazine, innovation and what inspires her.

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Artist and writer Austin Kleon on stealing, index cards, upright pianos and the obits

In his books, posts and notes writer and artist Austin Kleon has created an amazing dialogue about art, creativity and making things in our webby world. “I’ve always looked up to artists who don’t hoard their secrets and are open about their processes,” he said. When it comes to news, Kleon said he subscribes to Sturgeon’s Law: “90 percent of everything is crap.”

Kleon took a few minutes to talk with SND as part of our Year-Long Conversation about design.

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Olympics Wrap: UK Front Pages

Wrapping up the SportsDesigner-SND cameo right here, and it seems fitting to end it simply, with some closing ceremony front pages. Seriously, what’s left after that? The Times of London The Guardian The Independent The Telegraph The Sun The Daily Mail Bonus i. The Guardian’s Brick-By-Brick piece — which, in the U.S., we recall from [...]

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Olympics from El Correo

A look at a missed set of preview graphics from El Correo.

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Olympics: Latest from the NYT

More interactive graphics, the soccer gold-medal page and an up-close look at the decathlon from the New York Times.

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Olympics Roundup: Bolt, Diving and Bronze

Today’s collection leads off with a motion-capture graphic from the New York Times, this one is on how to win on the high dive: Find the graphic here: Leap three stories, impress judges. U-Sain in the Mem-brane!!! There is zero chance I didn’t say that back in the 2008 Olympics roundup from whatever day this [...]

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Olympics Graphics: Boston Globe and More

Checking out a video infographic on weightlifting and a tower graphic from the Boston Globe, as well as more from the NYT and other U.S. papers.

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Olympics: Comparing 100-meter winners

UPDATED WITH PAGES. The New York Times compares every Olympics 100-meter winner ever.

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Olympics: Catching up with the Times and more

A glance at some Times of London pages from the past week, and catching up with a few U.S. papers from this weekend.

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Olympics Graphics from LAT Online

A practical approach to Olympics graphics online that almost any outlet interested in an online graphics presence could pull off.

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Olympics Mini-Roundup: August 1

More from the New York Times, including a race featuring every 100-meter freestyle medalist ever, plus pages from Boston, Detroit and Buffalo.

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SI Photographers Discuss Olympics

Members of the Sports Illustrated photo team discuss the Olympics, and historic photos from previous Games.

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Olympics Roundup: Day 3

A contest to visualize the Games, the fronts from The Guardian and Times, and the sports front from the Buffalo News.

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Olympics: More from the NYT

A look at some more early-Olympic presentations and a high-end online infographic from the New York Times.

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Olympics Day 2 Coverage: Drama and Upsets

Taking a spin through presentations of the rather shocking two-and-out performance from the Spanish soccer team. A look at L’Equipe’s web presence, and a glance at how China Daily is presenting the Games online.

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Olympics: London Interactives (Plus One)

A glance at some infographics, photography and other digital experiences from some of the UK national papers based in London.

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New York Times Olympic Preview

The roundup of print previews really was not complete without sharing the New York Times’ work. A selection of their preview pages is here.

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Olympics Front Pages: Opening Ceremonies

A selection of A1 approaches from around the world after the opening ceremonies.

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Olympics Preview Roundup II

Glance II around the world at Olympics preview pages and graphics, including six Los Angeles Times covers, the New York Times breaking down individual sports, and every visual imaginable from the Times of Oman.

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Olympics Preview Roundup I

First of two trips around the Olympics preview horn on Friday.

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Visualize the Games III: Surviving the Grind

Keeping your visuals — and your sanity — safe for the fortnight-plus.

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Andy Kirk talks data visualization and the Olympics

As the clock ticks closer to the Opening Ceremony of the London Games, publications around the world will undoubtedly begin revealing data visualizations that explore the breadth and depth of one of the world’s greatest sporting events. Andy Kirk, the United Kingdom-based data visualization expert who founded Visualising Data, took time to help make sense [...]

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The view from London: 24 hours to go, let the Games begin

The London Olympics are virtually upon us. Not discounting the Women’s Football which saw Team GB thrash New Zealand 1-0, now its the real deal. So many people, so much heat. And plenty ado across print and digital media. Metro, the city’s most successful freesheet with a circulation of 3.8 million, will print seven days [...]

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Just before London, a look back at Beijing

China wowed the world with their performance at the 2008 Olympic opening ceremonies. Their newspapers matched that performance in their own way. Magnificent combinations of text, visuals and innovative formats were at work during the Beijing olympics as the papers kept pace with the action in the stadium. As part of the year long conversation, SND talked to 2 of the award-winning Chinese designers about their coverage of the Beijing Olympics.

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The view from London: Three days before the Games, city and its newsrooms are abuzz

This week, we Brits are waiting for our third and final injection of happiness. Two days after Bradley Wiggins became the first Briton to win the Tour de France, the sun is finally shining and the capital is hot. With 3 days to go, most Londoners are now giddy. Although in most newsrooms across the city, designers, developers and the odd director are now going gaga.

Check out snd.org/conversation for more coverage of the London Games.

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Talking Olympics infographics with Jan Schwochow (plus check out the Olympics issue of IN GRAPHICS)

The stunning visual work of IN GRAPHICS creates that unique humbling, inspiring feeling that makes us all want to be better storytellers. This “magazine for visual people” out of Berlin, Germany has raked in the awards and accolades. But to hold a copy is to embrace the craft of printing and experience the skill and touch of visual storytelling at its best. The magazine comes out twice a year and focuses on timely issues on a series of spreads. Read more here. Editor and Publisher Jan Schwochow took a few minutes to talk with SND about the new Olympics issue.

This interview is part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation about design. Read more about the Olympics and other conversation pieces here.

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Q&A with Joe Ward: Behind the scenes at The New York Times, as they plan Olympic graphics

The Olympics are a bit like Christmas for a graphics department: strong visuals, fast data, high concepts. Plus everyone knows the Games are coming, so it’s easy to make a plan and use the opportunity to try out new ways of storytelling. In a little over a week we’ll be able to check out the storytelling from the powerhouse graphics department at The New York Times, an incredible group of journalists and artists who are on a 5-year streak of wowing the web and visual journalism world. Sports Graphics Editor Joe Ward, who will be London for the Games, took a few moments to talk with us about the Times’ plans.

This interview is part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation about design. Read more about the Olympics and other conversation pieces here.

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Wilson Miner on vintage stereo equipment, context, and nudging the world in the right direction

Now with Facebook, digital designer Wilson Miner of Rdio, Everyblock, Django and a little electronics company called Apple. His “When we Build”
talk is worth skipping six months of online cat videos. Everyblock, he said learned a lot from journalism, “The biggest lesson from journalism for me was the importance of context,” he said. “All this data we were dealing with, none of it means anything in isolation. What I was always trying to do (with varying degrees of success) was to find ways to put each story or each data point in context with everything else connected to it.”

Miner took a few minutes to talk with SND as part of our Year-Long Conversation about design.

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Visualize the Games Vol. 2: Information and graphics

Olympic coverage can overwhelm even very large departments more than just about any other regularly occurring sporting event because of the volume of information available. You want to argue that the Super Bowl is annually more important to your audience, or the World Cup? That’s valid, but even global-scale events such as those have parameters. You can see the edge of the sandbox when you’re in the middle of it. You never have to worry about readers wanting to know about a local table tennis sensation when you’re planning your daily World Cup graphics. You don’t have to balance swimming and gymnastics with your runup to the Super Bowl.

The most crucial piece of Olympics advice for information designers is, get ahead of the Games. If you haven’t begun graphics planning and at least sketching your big-picture pieces of information, you need to catch up quickly. Separate your planning into two categories:

This is the second in a series of Olympic design tips. Please feel free to engage us in a discussion about them, commenting here or on Facebook or Twitter, hashtag #sndolympics.

Read more about Olympic design as part of our Year-Long Conversation here.)

Coming soon: Graphic planning, in print and online

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The colors, the city, the speed: A love letter to the Olympic Games

Last week, I started thinking about why it is that I love the Olympics so much. There’s not really one simple answer.

For as long as I’ve been designing pages, whenever the Games roll around, I’m engrossed. It is, by far, my favorite time to be in a newsroom. Some people get that way about elections; others about baseball playoffs or the Super Bowl. Despite having worked in some capacity in or with sports departments for most of the last 15 years, I’m not a big sports fan, so neither of those last two really do it for me. The Olympics are different, though. The Olympics are a cultural event. They are the world on a stage, and there are stories to tell that go far beyond what happens on a track, in a pool or on a court. Those stories tug on heartstrings, diminish (or in some cases, emphasize) cultural differences, bring people and countries together.

The only other event I can think of that conjures up similar feelings is the World Cup. I was lucky enough to go to South Africa with some friends two years ago to experience that first-hand, and it only made me want to witness an Olympiad that much more. For the first time in my life, this year, I’m making that happen and will be in London for the final two weeks of the Games.

(Tim writes as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation and discussion of the London Games. Read more here.)

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Where cricket is king: How one paper from India covered the Olympics

The New Indian Express, covered the 2006 Beijing Olympics from all aspects.

Surprising design packages were highlights throughout the Games. And it was the paper’s design editor at the time Deepak Harichandan (now design editor at Times of India).

What was the secret of success of New Indian Express during the 2008 Summer Games? “It’s sheer planning and hard work,” Deepak said. “We approached the big event from the out-of-the-box. And it had paid well.”

Deepak reflects on his paper’s Olympic preparations as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation and discussion about Olympic news design.

More design tips for the Olympics.

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Visualize the Games, Vol. 1: Planning and Brainstorming

As part of our summer discussion about the London Olympics, SND’s Year-Long Conversation will feature a series of tips and advice for visual journalists preparing to cover the Games. I will offer up the first installment here, but as this series progresses, we will aim to feature advice from journalists around the world, across multiple mediums and in all facets of newsrooms. The pieces will be concise, to the point, and please feel free to engage us in a discussion about them, commenting here or on Facebook or Twitter, hashtag #sndolympics.

Coming soon: Graphic planning, in print and online

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SND + H/H event this weekend: Design for coders in Cambridge, Mass.

On Saturday, SND’s web publications director Miranda Mulligan is organizing a workshop for coders who want to improve their design skills. We ask Miranda a few questions about SND + H/H: Q: Who is this workshop intended for? A while back, a couple colleagues and I started brainstorming on actionable activities that might help get [...]

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Best field trip ever: The story of Ball State students headed to London to cover the Games

In about 45 days, students from the journalism and telecommunications departments at Ball State University will have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to cover the Olympic Games in London. The immersive-learning experience will allow those who have excelled in the classroom and in student media a chance to showcase their skills on a world stage.

Ryan Sparrow, instructor of journalism at Ball State and Best of Digital Design competition coordinator for the Society for News Design, will be leading the program, BSU at the Games.

• Slideshow of award-winning Olympic pages.
• Michael Agar on the view from London

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Bigger, stronger, faster: 32 years of SND award-winning Olympics design

Few events are guaranteed to bring out the best in visual journalism the way the Summer Olympics do. They are intrinsically visual, relatively predictable for planning purposes (the dates are set, swimming the first week, track the second), and offer dramatic storylines and personality pieces that make for great page design, infographics, photography and digital design.

With that in mind, it’s instructive to take a look back at some of the Best of News Design pages from Olympics past. The SND Best of News Design competition was launched in an Olympic year, 1980, and every fourth annual edition chronicles the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat as presented in newspapers around the globe.

• From now until the London Games begin July 27, SND will feature a number of essays, tips and resources as part of our Year-Long Conversation about design.

• How London papers are covering the build-up to the Games by Region 15 director Michael Agar

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The view from London: Countdown to the Games is on

The build-up has been long, and so has the planning. But with just under two months to go until the Opening Ceremony at the Olympic Stadium in Stratford in East London, the deadlines are looming. As I gather, most newsrooms have planned their coverage, and budgeted their financial requirements. At the Daily Telegraph, my old [...]

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Storify founder Burt Herman on how design fuels start-ups, disruptive change and what journalists need to know

Burt Herman was a real foreign correspondent. As a reporter and bureau chief for the AP, Herman covered the world beat for 12 years. The front page of his website features a photo of him crouching behind a stone wall next to a man holding a gun the size of a fourth grader. His tagline? “Entrepreneurial journalist stoking media revolution.” A few years ago, Herman took a leave from his AP job, to become a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford. He met Xavier Damman and the two of them co-founded Storify, an online tool used to curate bits and pieces of social media into one story.

Herman took a few minutes to talk with SND as part of our Year-Long Conversation about design.

Behind the World’s Best Designed: Excelsior

According Alexandro Medrano, at Excelsior, a designer or artist’s average day isn’t very different than it would be while working at other newspapers when it comes to executing pages. They gather content and chase down visual opportunities. The difference lies in the philosophy.

That philosophy, according to Medrano — “Those of us who do things differently are those who make a trend.” — dictates everything they do, whether part of the newspaper, TV or Internet. Read more about Excelsior after the jump.

This is the last of this week’s features with the visual leaders at SND33’s World’s Best Designed publications, five newspapers and a website, as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation.

Read about the other World’s Best designed papers and website:

• Soren Nyland talks about how Politiken maintains its unique voice.

• Creativity and teamwork at The National Post, with managing editor Gayle Grin.

• Go behind the scenes at The Grid, with creative director Vanessa Wyse.

• Read an interview with Peter Breul, art director of Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung.

• Read an interview with BostonGlobe.com’s Miranda Mulligan, 2011 World’s Best Designed website. Read more here.

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Behind the World’s Best Designed: Politiken

The design of Politiken is big and bold. The overall colors are red, black and white. These are the main tools at hand when the 12 page designers — four are trainees — approach the broadsheet canvas of Politiken’s main sections. And the tabloid canvas of the special sections. The result will be pages that celebrate simplicity, cleanliness and kicking communication. To quote Charlie Chaplin: “Simplicity is not a simple thing”. But if your staff strives after simplicity it often ends up in sophisticated results. More after the jump

This is the fifth in this week’s features with the visual leaders at SND33’s World’s Best Designed publications, five newspapers and a website, as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation.

• Creativity and teamwork at The National Post, with managing editor Gayle Grin.

• Go behind the scenes at The Grid, with creative director Vanessa Wyse.

• Read an interview with Peter Breul, art director of Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung.

• Read an interview with BostonGlobe.com’s Miranda Mulligan, 2011 World’s Best Designed website. Read more here.

• Coming Friday: Behind the scenes at Mexico City’s Excelsior

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Behind the World’s Best Designed: The National Post

The National Post is deeply devoted to visual storytelling and delivering the biggest visual wow, day in, day out. Everyone involved in the paper — from reporters to editors to designers — knows and respects that. Throughout the newsroom, imagination and ideas are respected and visual display and creativity is regarded as much as the authority of words. Many of us began together at the startup of the paper in 1998 and the talent well at the Post is deep. We know our audience and we like to delight them with humor, surprise, and great analysis of the news, as well as a good dose of investigative reporting. Read more about our process on the jump.

This is the fourth in this week’s features with the visual leaders at SND33’s World’s Best Designed publications, five newspapers and a website, as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation.

• Go behind the scenes at The Grid, with creative director Vanessa Wyse.

• Read an interview with Peter Breul, art director of Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung.

• Read an interview with BostonGlobe.com’s Miranda Mulligan, 2011 World’s Best Designed website. Read more here.

• Coming Thursday: An interview with Politiken’s Søren Nyland

More of SND’s Year-Long Conversation

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Behind the World’s Best Designed: The Grid

From the start at The Grid, our alt-weekly in Toronto, we set out to create a hybrid between a magazine and a newspaper — something that looked and read like a magazine but physically was more akin to a newspaper. Therefore our production cycle is very similar to that of a magazine. The spunky, smart publication has racked up a range of award in its first year, including one of the five World’s Best Designed papers.

This is the third in this week’s features with the visual leaders at SND33’s World’s Best Designed publications, five newspapers and a website, as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation.

• Read an interview with Peter Breul, art director of Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung.

• Read an interview with BostonGlobe.com’s Miranda Mulligan, 2011 World’s Best Designed website. Read more here.

• Coming Wednesday: An interview with The National Post’s Gayle Grin

SND’s Year-Long Conversation

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Behind the World’s Best Designed: Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung

For the fifth time since 2002, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung was awarded the prize for the “World’s Best-Designed Newspaper” by the Society for News Design. Today we talk with the paper’s esteemed art director Peter Breul.

This kicks off a week of interviews with the visual leaders at SND33’s World’s Best Designed publications, five newspapers and a website, as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation.

• Read an interview with BostonGlobe.com’s Miranda Mulligan, 2011 World’s Best Designed website. Read more here.

• Coming Tuesday: An interview with The Grid’s Vanessa Wyse

SND’s Year-Long Conversation

Behind the World’s Best designed: BostonGlobe.com

In 2011, the launch of BostonGlobe.com quickly redefined the standard for what a news organization’s website could be. It created a responsive-viewing experience that automatically adjusts to the constraints of a user’s screen size or device. For its effort, SND33 gave it the distinction of being named World’s Best designed website. The Globe’s Digital Design [...]

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Meet Mizzou’s Theresa Berens: SND’s student designer of the year

University of Missouri’s Theresa Berens was named Student Designer of the year at 2012 College News Design Contest last month in Columbia, Mo. Theresa is a graduate student studying editorial design. She graduates this month and is looking for a full-time gig in the fall.

The judges observed that her work always goes above and beyond. “She knows when to introduce surprises and fun and explanatory elements. She knows how to take an idea and carry it through an entire section. Her work was the best work we saw in a number of categories.”

Theresa was kind enough to talk with SND about her future plans, what inspires her, the best design advice she’s received and more after the jump.

Want some news you can use? Here are reflections for a College News Design judge Miranda Mulligan.

Here is a list of winners.

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Designer Josh Rhode on storytelling, making news cool and Ernest Hemingway

Designer Josh Rhode’s work combines perfect function with beautiful form, whether it’s Nike, Honda, MTV or others. His branding, apps and sites epitomize how information can be useful and incredibly cool. Josh took a few minutes to talk with SND as part of our Year-Long Conversation about Design. He talked about what makes his projects work, the values he has when putting together a project across platforms and why the news should be cool.

Read more on the jump.

• For other QAs and more of the Year-Long Conversation, go here.

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Motion graphics: New weapons of visual journalism

Who doesn’t love a good superhero story? Let’s see, there is Batman, Spiderman, Superman, Super Girl, Super … well, there are actually a lot of them. Take your pick! One thing that they all have in common is weapons or tactics to help them achieve success. In newsrooms everywhere, the weapons and tactics for storytelling [...]

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iA’s Oliver Reichstein on secrets, making websites, and “business class” news

As part of our Year-Long Conversation about design, we talk with Information Architects’ Oliver Reichstein
on keeping design simple, iA’s work on Writer and iPad design and a “business class” on the web, where users could pay to get the junk out of the way. “The more design gets out of your way the more space you have to do with an interface what you want to do. Design works, when you don’t notice it.”

Could a “business class” work where you work? Leave your comments below.

— Read more posts from SND’s Year-Long Conversation here.

The bailout of Greece, by Ricardo Martinez.

Visualizing the story: How El Mundo covered the world economic crisis with infographics

As the world economic crisis unfolded, Spain was hit especially hard. The depth and length of the story put a special challenge on visual journalists, to explain and show a complicated, ever-changing story.

Here is how El Mundo covered the story, a model for breaking news infographics, presented here as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation. Read more Conversation pieces here.

Also, this week, stay tuned to snd.org for coverage of Malofiej,
the annual infographics gathering in Pamplona, Spain, the 20th anniversary of that great event.

2012 Resolution: February Update from our self-improvers

In early January, you were introduced to five visual journalists who volunteered to take part in SND’s Year-Long Conversation. Their goal? To learn new skills that will help prepare them for new challenges that lie ahead in our ever-changing industry — and share their journey with you here at SND.org. Here are their updates for [...]

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Behind Upstatement’s bold, new typography app: Glyphosaurus

Who doesn’t love the voluptuous curves of a ‘w’ or the stout simplicity of a lower-case ‘l.’ So many wonderful ‘g’s in the world. Agree? Well, have we got the site for you. The folks at Boston’s Upstatement have developed Glyphosaurus, a wonderfully entertaining web app that let’s folks share found typography. They sat down with SND over email and told us about the project as part of our Year-Long Conversation about Design

More on the jump.

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Joey Marburger on the Washington Post’s new Politics App

Last week, The Washington Post launched an iPad app that aggregates all of the Post’s political content into a one-stop-politics-shop, good for your average reader and for the most voracious political junkie. But this app is much more than an aggregator. There are videos, maps, visual representations of the candidates positions and how they’ve shifted over [...]

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The Onion’s design director on iPads, UX, and those miserable looking people in the Onion’s quote-opinion pieces

How much fun is it to work at the Onion? Turns out, it’s kind of a lot.

Today, as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation, Veronika Goldberg is the Onion’s Chicago-based design director takes a few minutes to talk with us and tell us. “Everyone is certainly quirky and wonderfully unique. Nothing is off-limits, so unlike most office environments, individuality is encouraged,” Veronika said.

Read our other Year-Long Conversation dispatches here.

2012 Resolution: January Update from our self-improvers

In early January, you were virtually introduced to a handful of visual journalists who boldly volunteered to take part in SND’s Year-Long Conversation. Their goal? To learn new skills that will help prepare them for new challenges that lie ahead in our ever-changing industry — and share their journey with you here at SND.org. Here [...]

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Facebook’s Ben Barry on hacking, learning to code, and thinking on his bike

As news of everyone’s favorite social network going public ripples across the world, SND took a few minutes to trade questions with Facebook designer Ben Barry to talk Facebook, design, user experience … and coding.

A sample: “You need to know the technical constraints of the medium to know what’s possible and you need to know how to work with an engineer to execute your vision.”

This is part of a series of interviews in SND’s Year-Long Conversation
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Start-up lessons: A homicide site in DC

What can you learn about design and development from a site about homicides? A lot, it turns out as we see in this dispatch in SND’s Year-Long Conversation about design.

  • Do what you can—now.
  • Use what you can—now.
  • Build what you can—now.
  • Take risks.
  • Evaluate.
  • Be public.
  • Think creatively.
  • Trust that things will fall into place.
  • But do what you can to make them fall into the right places.
  • Never stop looking forward.
  • Find your purpose, define it, and live by it.
    • Adonis Durado

      Report from India: Inspiring great design, in print and online

      The WAN-IFRA, SND news design conference in New Dehli this week brought together visuals leaders from around the world for the first workshop of its kind.

      Featuring Javier Errea, of Errea Communications, Adonis Durado, of the Times of Oman, Tyson Evans, of the New York Times to name only a few. Here is a summary of the workshop.

      More about news design in India here as part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation.

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      Introducing SND India — where everyone loves to read

      Jan. 23 in New Dehli a group of visual journalism leaders will come together for a first-of-its kind workshop, focusing on best practices in print and online. The workshop brought together by SND and WAN-IFRA also marks the launch of SND India welcoming an important part of the world into the SND community.

      What is news design like in India? It’s a land of tens of thousands of newspapers and magazines and readers who love to read. So much so that pages are more likely to feature long stories than large photographs or infographics.

      Much more on the jump from this dispatch from India, part of SND’s Year-Long Conversation.

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      Lessons from primaries past: Five election design tips

      After voting in Iowa and New Hampshire, the race for the GOP nomination shifts to South Carolina. SND asked The Washington Post, New Hampshire’s Union-Leader, the Des Moines Register and South Carolina’s The State to share some of their historical primary pages from previous election cycles. What is included are pages from 1980, 1988, 2000 and this year. Look for more on the election this week.

      We also took down some things to remember when covering the vote for the GOP nomination. More on the jump.

      Let’s talk about readability on the web. On Twitter at #readme

      Right after the click or touch, in that millisecond before the animations kick in, the gifs become animated and the wizzes start to bang, people have the reasonable expectation to read something. Actually read something. In the reading world we live in, how many shapes and colors and colorful shapes do we put in the [...]

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      Mandy Brown talks design, news and, ahem, reading

      Is the web a good place to read? We spend more time than ever digesting digital text from sites and feeds, but is it a good reading experience? Especially for those who spend clicks on news sites, it seems there is much stacked against the simple, and central, act of reading.

      Today we talk with one of the web’s best, Mandy Brown, about readability, and design. Mandy’s passion for reading is what fuels her design. Read her work on A List Apart, A Working Library. Our interview is on the jump.

      This is our second dispatch in SND’s Year-Long Conversation. Find last week’s post here.

      Eye-trap: What happens when you trace over the reading wells on popular news sites? Check the results of our eye-trap readability study.

      Join the discussion: We’ll host an ongoing discussion of readability on the web on Twitter with the hashtag #readme. More on that discussion here.

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      How you can join the conversation

      SND would like to invite you to join our Year-Long Conversation, a 365 day experiment about all things news design that starts today. The Conversation headquarters is right here on snd.org where we’ll post essays, discussions, images, files to share and news of other ways the conversation will date place on social media and at events and meet-ups.

      Here is what we have to get the conversation started:

    • Self-improvement: Meet the five journalists who volunteered to let SND follow them as they learn and grow in 2012. More here.
    • Open-source graphic: SND and The Chicago Tribune offer you this breakdown of Tuesday’s caucus to publish as long as credit and source are included. Click here for more.
    • Expand your view: Matt Mansfield advocates looking beyond journalism to kick off your 2012 design thinking. Click here to read more.
    • Join SND: Take full advantage of being a member
    • Enter our annual print or digital competitions — deadlines are coming up fast!
    • SNDCle: Sign up for our annual workshop in Cleveland.
    • 2012 resolution: Meet five who want to improve themselves this year

      In 2012 SND will host a Year-Long Conversation about all things news design. The conversation will take place on the site and at various events around the world. These five visual journalists have volunteered to take part of an 2012 experiment: to try and improve themselves over the coming year and we’ll document it here. [...]

      Open-source Iowa Caucus graphic

      One element of SND’s Year-Long Conversation will be to bring visual journalists together and to share work and insights. With such a huge news year ahead, the Chicago Tribune agreed to share this portion of its Election 2012 coverage as an open-source graphic. Feel free to publish the graphic, or information from the graphic in [...]

      An expansive definition of design

      What do we mean when we talk about design? Seems like a good question as we start a new year. Journalist friends answer in different ways, yet their responses always appear — in my mind’s eye, at least — too tied to their lives at whatever media organization they work for, the print or online [...]

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      New Years Resolution: Improve yourself in 2012 and tell your story on snd.org

      In 2012 SND will host a Year-Long Conversation about all things news design. The conversation will take place on the site and at various events around the world.

      To kick start one part of that effort, we are on the hunt for five visual journalists who wish to take part in a 2012 experiment: We are looking for people who want to learn and improve themselves in the coming year and we want to document it.

      Want to learn more? Click on the jump.